Hedges emerges as Padres' catcher

By Bill Center / San Diego Padres |

Bill Center, longtime sportswriter for U-T San Diego, is an employee of the Padres.

The Padres' future at catching became much clearer last week.

Austin Hedges is the man.

Not only did the Padres trade last year's starter, Derek Norris, to the Washington Nationals for prized Minor League pitching prospect Pedro Avila, they non-tendered reserve catcher Hector Sanchez.

The 24-year-old Hedges is the Padres' catcher, although he has yet to prove he can hit Major League pitching. And the No. 2 is Christian Bethancourt, whom the Padres are grooming to be a hybrid catcher-pitcher-outfielder.

They could add another backup catcher this offseason. That would allow them to make an even stronger commitment to developing Bethancourt for his unique role. The Padres could carry three -- or 2 1/3 - catchers in 2017.

But it is clear that Hedges, who has coveted skills behind the plate, is the Padres' catcher moving forward.

The presence of Hedges at Triple-A El Paso last season made catching one of the strongest positions in the Padres' system. But his promotion to the Major League job changes that part of the equation.

Austin Allen is the only catcher ranked among the Padres' top 30 prospects and he will likely start this season at Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore. Rocky Gale is the only other catcher currently in the system with Major League experience -- and that is limited to 11 cameo appearances in 2015.

So, Hedges is the man.

When it comes to the handling of pitchers and the ability to throw out runners, there is no question that the Padres' second-round pick in the 2011 Draft can do the job. The 6-foot-1, 210-pound Hedges has great defensive skills.

That was very apparent in 2015 when then 22-year-old Hedges caught in about a third of the Padres games. Pitchers, notably Tyson Ross and Ian Kennedy, raved about Hedges' skills behind the plate.

Hedges threw out 16 runners on 49 stolen-base attempts. His catcher's earned run average of 3.85 was the third-best mark among Major League rookie catchers with 300 innings or more behind the plate. It was also the third-best mark ever by a Padres rookie catcher.

But Hedges hit only .168 in 137 Major League at-bats in 2015 with three homers and 11 RBIs. Hedges hit only .125 in 24 late-season at-bats last year -- lowering his Major League average to .161 in 161 at-bats with the Padres.

Defense is not an issue with Hedges and never has been. Even as a high school player in 2011 in San Juan Capistrano, some scouts said his defensive skills were close to being Major League ready. Hedges will do the job behind the plate.

The question remains offense, although he hit .326 with 28 doubles, a triple, 23 homers and 97 RBIs in just 384 at-bats with Triple-A El Paso over the 2015-2016 seasons. He also had a .361 on-base percentage and a .583 slugging percentage for a .944 OPS as a Chihuahua.

So Hedges will get a chance to show what he can do both offensively and defensively as a Padre in 2017 as a 24-year-old -- still the age when most players are reaching the Major Leagues.

Behind the plate as a catcher, Hedges is superior to Norris. Offensively, well, Norris hit only .186 last season with 14 homers and 42 RBIs.

However, catchers are more susceptible to injuries than many players. Hedges, for example, missed more than a month at El Paso last season after having surgery to remove the hook of the hamate bone in his right hand.

Bethancourt, 25, looked to be developing into a solid backup last year. But the Padres are now looking at the 6-foot-2, 210-pounder as a pitcher and outfielder as well as a catcher. Bethancourt has power. He hit six homers with 25 RBIs in just 193 at-bats last year. But his role for 2017 is undefined as the Padres investigate the "hybrid" possibilities.

So the need for a third catcher is real. Right now, there isn't a third catcher on the 40-man roster.

Prospects: The best catching prospect in the Padres system becomes the 22-year-old Allen, the Padres' fourth-round pick in the 2015 Draft out of Florida Tech. The 6-foot-4, 225-pound, left-handed hitter is ranked the Padres' 25th-best prospect by MLBPipeline.com. He hit .320 with 22 doubles, seven homers and 61 RBIs for Class A Fort Wayne in 2016 before finishing the season with Double-A San Antonio. He was a Midwest League regular-season and postseason All-Star. Could he jump Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore and start the season in San Antonio? Possibly, because there are not a lot of other options above him.

Gale, 28, is the only other catcher with Major League experience in the Padres system and hit .278 at El Paso with Hedges last year as well as splitting time with Ryan Miller at San Antonio. A.J. Kennedy shared the catching duties at Lake Elsinore last season with Jose Ruiz, who has since transitioned into a pitcher.

Deeper in the system are some interesting youngsters.

Sixteen-year-old Venezuelan Alison Quintero was considered the No. 22 prospect in all of Latin America when he signed with the Padres last July. Another Venezuelan is 18-year-old Jose Lezama, who hit .259 with a .373 on-base percentage last summer for the Rookie-level Arizona Padres. Mexico native Bryant Aragon, 18, hit .243 while moving from the Dominican Republic to the Arizona League last summer. Chris Mattison, 22, hit only .162 for Class A Short-Season Tri-City last summer after being a 16th-round pick out of Florida's Southeastern University.

Overview: Defensively, the Padres are set with Hedges behind the plate. Offense is still a big question, although the pressure to perform won't be great, as Padres catchers hit .198 in 2016 with a .253 on-base percentage and a .602 OPS. A third catcher could still be added to the mix, especially if Bethancourt is developed into a hybrid catcher-pitcher-outfielder.

ABCA Barnstorming Event - Cal St Fullerton

The last stop on the ABCA Barnstorming tour was at Cal St Fullerton this past Sunday and it was better than I expected and I went it looking to learn a lot. Held inside the hitting facility down the RF line we listened to seven speakers ranging from practice organization and having fun to simplifying drills and focusing on mental practice with your team. Overall it was a great day to learn more about the game and how to be a better coach. We'll be attending the 2017 ABCA Convention in Anaheim from January 5-8 to listen to clinicians and speakers all across the board in professional and amateur baseball.    I wanted to recap and share   some highlights from each speaker and post some photos of the notes they passed out and what I gathered from their talks. Below is a summary of the day:    Rick Vanderhook | Cal St Fullerton Head Coach   - Catch play is all about defense - it is the move overlooked part of practice. Warmup to throw, not throw to warmup.  - Everything is routine oriented. Once players know where and what they do then they need to "DO what they are supposed to do"  - Infields need to line themselves up. You won't be able to hear "left or right" in a big game.  - Infield fungo should be 90 seconds each drill then switch. infielders need to learn to throw from different angles.  - alignment and cuts is a relay race. outfielders need to take care of the ball. fullerton won 2 college world series because of dropped balls before a throw back into the cutoff man!  - college freshman need two above average pitches for a strike - a fastball and a change up.  - high school catcher's don't throw 1.7 to second base. mlb average last year was 1.92 for 2016. catchers need to throw a 2.0 to second and let pitchers handle keeping them close.   Dan Keller | Lifeletics and Dugout Captain   - When doing drills follow these steps: 1. Discuss 2. Give example 3. Repetition 4. competition 5. have fun  - know why you coach or why you play. almost all players will not be in the mlb so they need to learn life skills.   Scott Picker | Former Cypress College Head Coach   - ask players for feedback. ask players to give a starting lineup offensively and defensively.  - his personal philosophy is never play double play depth unless it ends an inning with risp. allow more range for middle iNF.   Blake Hawksworth | Cal St Fullerton Assistant Coach   - goal: 2 strikes out of first 3 pitches.  - keep the routine. pace of catch play is deliberate.   Don Sneddon | Santa Ana College Head Coach   - simplify everything. players must trust the coach and trust the drill.  - have a minimum play level. a standard of play. when it's early or the team is down they need to go up to that level. when there is too much adrenaline in a big game they need to go back down to that level.  - find a way to get ready to play every day. physically and mentally.  - know how to fail .body image is huge! control your body.  - players must have confidence in 1&3, Bunt D, Alignment.   Alan Jaeger | Jaeger Sports   - breathing and moving creates energy.  - impact the person, not just the athlete.  - you become what you practice. practice to get into the zone.  - the zone is: non future/past, pure immersion, empty and quiet, opposite of life  - 2 parts to the mental game: 1. Game management 2. mental practice  - identify your process and be great at it. everything else is secondary. everything else is drama.  - drama is endless. the zone is confined and knowable. figure out what needs to happen to execute successfully.  - if overthinking or stressing out - you are not in the zone. the zone does not allow drama.  - athletes need to be able to default to their process to get into the zone.

The last stop on the ABCA Barnstorming tour was at Cal St Fullerton this past Sunday and it was better than I expected and I went it looking to learn a lot. Held inside the hitting facility down the RF line we listened to seven speakers ranging from practice organization and having fun to simplifying drills and focusing on mental practice with your team. Overall it was a great day to learn more about the game and how to be a better coach. We'll be attending the 2017 ABCA Convention in Anaheim from January 5-8 to listen to clinicians and speakers all across the board in professional and amateur baseball.

I wanted to recap and share some highlights from each speaker and post some photos of the notes they passed out and what I gathered from their talks. Below is a summary of the day:

Rick Vanderhook | Cal St Fullerton Head Coach

- Catch play is all about defense - it is the move overlooked part of practice. Warmup to throw, not throw to warmup.

- Everything is routine oriented. Once players know where and what they do then they need to "DO what they are supposed to do"

- Infields need to line themselves up. You won't be able to hear "left or right" in a big game.

- Infield fungo should be 90 seconds each drill then switch. infielders need to learn to throw from different angles.

- alignment and cuts is a relay race. outfielders need to take care of the ball. fullerton won 2 college world series because of dropped balls before a throw back into the cutoff man!

- college freshman need two above average pitches for a strike - a fastball and a change up.

- high school catcher's don't throw 1.7 to second base. mlb average last year was 1.92 for 2016. catchers need to throw a 2.0 to second and let pitchers handle keeping them close.

Dan Keller | Lifeletics and Dugout Captain

- When doing drills follow these steps: 1. Discuss 2. Give example 3. Repetition 4. competition 5. have fun

- know why you coach or why you play. almost all players will not be in the mlb so they need to learn life skills.

Scott Picker | Former Cypress College Head Coach

- ask players for feedback. ask players to give a starting lineup offensively and defensively.

- his personal philosophy is never play double play depth unless it ends an inning with risp. allow more range for middle iNF.

Blake Hawksworth | Cal St Fullerton Assistant Coach

- goal: 2 strikes out of first 3 pitches.

- keep the routine. pace of catch play is deliberate.

Don Sneddon | Santa Ana College Head Coach

- simplify everything. players must trust the coach and trust the drill.

- have a minimum play level. a standard of play. when it's early or the team is down they need to go up to that level. when there is too much adrenaline in a big game they need to go back down to that level.

- find a way to get ready to play every day. physically and mentally.

- know how to fail .body image is huge! control your body.

- players must have confidence in 1&3, Bunt D, Alignment.

Alan Jaeger | Jaeger Sports

- breathing and moving creates energy.

- impact the person, not just the athlete.

- you become what you practice. practice to get into the zone.

- the zone is: non future/past, pure immersion, empty and quiet, opposite of life

- 2 parts to the mental game: 1. Game management 2. mental practice

- identify your process and be great at it. everything else is secondary. everything else is drama.

- drama is endless. the zone is confined and knowable. figure out what needs to happen to execute successfully.

- if overthinking or stressing out - you are not in the zone. the zone does not allow drama.

- athletes need to be able to default to their process to get into the zone.

 

- Coach Reinsel

Cubs End 108-Year Wait for World Series Title, After a Little More Torment

CLEVELAND — If you are going to endure years — no, generations — of futility and heartbreak, when you do finally win a World Series championship, it may as well be a memorable one.

The Chicago Cubs did just that, shattering their 108-year championship drought in epic fashion: with an 8-7, 10-inning victory over the Cleveland Indians in Game 7, which began on Wednesday night, carried into Thursday morning and seemed to end all too soon.

When the Indians rallied with three runs in the eighth inning — including a two-out, two-strike, two-run thunderbolt of a home run by Rajai Davis off closer Aroldis Chapman — the Cubs found a way to beat back the ghosts of playoffs past.

After a brief rain delay following the ninth inning, they pushed two runs across in the 10th inning on a double by Ben Zobrist, the Series’s most valuable player, and a single by Miguel Montero.

The Cubs then had to hold their breath in the bottom of the inning when Davis hit a run-scoring single to pull the Indians to a run behind. But reliever Mike Montgomery replaced Carl Edwards and got Michael Martinez to hit a slow roller into the infield. Third baseman Kris Bryant scooped it up and threw across to first baseman Anthony Rizzo.

As the ball made its flight across the diamond, the stadium went silent for one of only a few times all night — and only until it settled into Rizzo’s glove. Then the huge contingent of Cubs fans erupted, and the players raced to the middle of the infield to celebrate.

“We’re world champions,” Rizzo said in the alcohol-soaked visitors’ clubhouse after he had taken a break from embracing the actor Bill Murray. “The Chicago Cubs are world champions. Let that sink in.”

Thousands of fans lingered for nearly an hour after the game, moving into the field level of the stadium, waving the ubiquitous W flags, singing the victory anthem “Go Cubs Go” and roaring when Rizzo held up the ball he had caught for the final out.

One fan held a sign: “Now I can die in peace.”

That sleep will no longer be tortured by old memories — of collapses in 1969, 1984 and 2003, and talk of curses of black cats, billy goats and Steve Bartman, the fan who infamously interfered with a foul ball in the playoffs.

“If you want to believe in that kind of stuff, it’s going to hold you back for a long time,” Cubs Manager Joe Maddon said. “I love tradition. I think tradition is worth time mentally, and tradition is worth being upheld. But curses and superstitions are not.”

On Wednesday night, the Cubs did not so much beat the Indians as survive them.

The heart-stopping end to the series — and the 108-year wait — carried with it an additional historical perk. The Cubs became the first team to rally from a three-games-to-one Series deficit since Kansas City did so in 1985 and the first to do it on the road since Pittsburgh in 1979.

Meanwhile, in this matchup of long-suffering franchises, the Indians’ suffering will carry on longer. They have not won since 1948 — and the excruciating way in which they suffered the defeat, with three consecutive losses — will take its place atop a list that until now was topped by the 1997 World Series, in which the Indians lost a ninth-inning lead, and eventually the Series, to Florida.

When the Indians retreated to their clubhouse during the rain delay, lockers were covered in plastic and Champagne was made ready.

“It’s going to hurt,” said Indians Manager Terry Francona, who called it an incredible game. “It hurts because we care, but they need to walk with their head held high because they left nothing on the field. And that’s all the things we ever ask them to do. They tried until there was nothing left.”

The Indians had overcome all season — the 24th-highest payroll in baseball was dented by injuries to outfielder Michael Brantley and pitchers Danny Salazar and Carlos Carrasco and the loss of two players to drug suspensions — and they fought uphill all night, never taking the lead on Wednesday.

To win, the Cubs beat two of the most dominant pitchers in this postseason — the Indians’ ace, Corey Kluber, and their versatile reliever Andrew Miller — who gave up more runs on Wednesday than they had allowed in the entire postseason. They then had to bounce back after Davis’s home run.

The roller coaster of a game took place in an unusually neutral environment, with so many of the Cubs’ passionate and well-heeled fans finding their way into the stadium. The crowd of 38,104 was evenly split, and the two groups of fans spent the evening alternating full-throated roars, robbing the environment of any lulls. Not even the 17-minute rain delay affected their spirits.

They were the latest to witness the Cubs, who won 103 games in the regular season — the most in baseball — showing their mettle during the playoffs.

They rallied from four runs down in the ninth inning to eliminate San Francisco, which had won 10 consecutive elimination games. After being shut out for 21 consecutive innings by Los Angeles in the National League Championship Series, they rebounded to win three in a row — beating Clayton Kershaw in the clincher.

When the Cubs went to Wrigley Field on Sunday knowing they would have to win three in a row, Rizzo lightened the mood. He arranged for the “Rocky” movies to be played on all of the televisions in the clubhouse and then shadowboxed around the room while half dressed.

Rizzo’s message: The Series was going the distance.

“It was like a heavyweight fight, man,” Zobrist said. “Just blow for blow, everybody playing their heart out. The Indians never gave up, either, and I can’t believe we’re finally standing, after 108 years, finally able to hoist the trophy.”

When the rain delay took effect after the ninth inning, Jason Heyward convened a player meeting in the weight room. He reminded everyone to forget about what had transpired and said that they would find a way to win.

“Everyone was fired up, and I didn’t expect that,” Montgomery said. “I expected everyone to be frustrated, down on themselves, down on the team. We just blew a three-run lead in the eighth inning with two outs. The next thing I know, everyone’s like, ‘We got this.’”

When the tarp was removed from the field, Kyle Schwarber began the 10th with a single to right off reliever Bryan Shaw, and Albert Almora pinch-ran for him. Bryant, who had homered in the previous two games, drove a ball deep to center that Davis caught on the warning track. It was far enough to allow Almora to tag up and take second. Shaw then walked Rizzo intentionally.

Zobrist sliced a two-strike pitch for a double into the left-field corner, scoring Almora and sending Rizzo to third, and the usually composed Zobrist pumped his fists wildly and screamed as he arrived at second base ahead of the throw.

After Addison Russell was intentionally walked, Montero followed with a single that brought home Rizzo. The runs took Chapman — who had gotten the final eight outs and thrown 42 pitches on Sunday to keep the Cubs alive — off the hook.

When he replaced Jon Lester in the eighth, with a runner at first and two outs, it was quickly apparent that he was spent. He allowed a run-scoring double to Brandon Guyer before Davis hit his two-run homer. The lead that the Cubs had built largely on the legs of home runs by Dexter Fowler, Baez and David Ross — the 39-year-old catcher who had said he would retire after the game — was gone.

The drama, however, was not.

By BILLY WITZNOV. 3, 2016

ELITE Pitching Off-Season Training Program

ELITE Pitching will be offering group off-season training programs for pitchers who want to work hard and learn how to take their game to the next level. We will be offering 3 Phases that include velocity training, mental preparation, throwing patterns, and arm care.

Get ready to understand the pitching motion more in depth through the following:

  • Plyocare ball exercises to remap parts of a delivery using overloaded implements to provide better kinesthetic awareness throughout the throwing motion.
  • Jaeger band stretches before and after throwing used to activate the external rotators and biceps, get blood flowing to the shoulder in general and to kickstart the recovery process.
  • Medicine ball, kettle bell, body weight workouts, and explosive moves to strengthen legs/core and increase overall fitness level.
  • Visual cues through slow-motion video and analysis to show pitchers proper technique.

Our program is designed for pitchers who are willing to learn and implement the latest research and drills into their motion and understand the functions of the body during warm up, throwing, and cool down. Each phase of our program is designed for the off-season pitcher to help maintain and improve your skills.

Pitching mechanics will not be discussed in detail as this is a program designed to maintain and strengthen pitcher's arms and bodies during the winter. For private training, please contact Ryan Reinsel for more information.

PHASE I

  • Details: $100/per player for (4) 60 minute sessions.
  • Number of pitchers: Minimum 4 - Max 6
  • Dates: 11/29, 12/6, 12/13, 12/20
  • Time: TBD

PHASE II

  • Details: $100/per player for (4) 60 minute sessions.
  • Number of pitchers: Minimum 4 - Max 6
  • Dates: January 2017
  • Time: TBD

PHASE III

  • Details: TBD

EBS Player and Elite client Austin Hedges called up to San Diego Padres

MLB.com | @AJCassavell | September 21st, 2016

SAN DIEGO -- The future is quickly becoming the present for the San Diego Padres, as the organization promoted four highly touted young hitters from Triple-A El Paso on Wednesday.

Outfielders Hunter Renfroe and Manuel Margot, second baseman Carlos Asuaje and catcher Austin Hedges arrived in San Diego before Wednesday's game against Arizona. So, too, did a pair of lefty relief arms in Buddy Baumann and Jose Torres.

The Padres held off on calling up some of their top prospects until the conclusion of the Triple-A playoffs, which ended Tuesday night with El Paso's 3-1 loss to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in Memphis.

None of the four were in Wednesday's lineup, but Padres manager Andy Green expects all of them to start Thursday night against the Giants.

"They have an opportunity to become a part of our core," Green said. "I think that's the message that should be out there right now. We're hopeful that they're our core group of guys. As you think about talent arriving at this level, they're our first wave, and how they perform on this field will determine how much of the core they are, going forward."

Margot (the club's No. 2 prospect, according to MLBPipeline.com), Renfroe (No. 3) and Asuaje (No. 20) will be making their Major League debuts.

Hedges, who is thought by many to be the club's catcher of the future, is no longer considered a prospect because of the service time he accrued in 2015. But he has yet to play a big league game this season. Renfroe will play exclusively right field, Green said, while Margot and Travis Jankowski will split time in the center. Torres -- whose first appearance will be his big league debut -- and Baumann provide some left-handed depth in the Padres' bullpen.

"It's an exciting time for them," Green said. "These guys, especially the ones that are coming up for the first time, they've earned this right to be here. All of them have done very well, and we're all very excited to get them."

Added Asuaje: "We keep a tight-knit group down there, and for us all to be called up at the same time, it's awesome. I think it's great for the organization as a whole."

The Padres had to clear room on the 40-man roster for Renfroe and Asuaje, who needed to be added before the Rule 5 Draft in December anyway. To do so, the club designated utility men Patrick Kivlehan and Nick Noonan for assignment.

Green confirmed that barring anything out of the ordinary, there will be no further callups this month.

The six Padres who arrived Wednesday played an integral role in El Paso's first Pacific Coast League championship. The Chihuahuas defeated the Oklahoma City Dodgers in four games, with Saturday's thrilling finale going 11 innings.

"I think it added so much value for us and gave us so much experience," Asuaje said of the playoff run. "Building a winning culture here in San Diego is what we want to do. I think it starts in the Minor Leagues and hopefully we can bring that up here to the Major Leagues."

Ranked No. 27 in MLB, the 21-year-old Margot is the most highly touted prospect to join the club this month. He batted .304/.351/.426 with 30 steals for El Paso, while drawing rave reviews on defense.

"It's a dream that you have since you were a little boy," Margot said through an interpreter. "So to be able to be here, it's a dream come true for me."

Renfroe, baseball's No. 41 overall prospect, was named the MVP of the Pacific Coast League, after batting .306/.336/.557 with 30 home runs this season.

As for Hedges, although he's no longer considered a prospect, few young catchers are thought of in such high regard. The 24-year-old batted .326/.353/.597 with 20 homers -- despite missing more than a month with a broken bone in his left hand.

"It was definitely frustrating at first when I hurt my hand," Hedges said. "… But to be able to come back and end up having a pretty good year, I was really pleased with how I bounced back and the adjustments that I made."

Asuaje took home PCL Rookie of the Year honors this season, batting .321/.378/.473. Like Margot, Asuaje was acquired from the Red Sox in the trade that sent Craig Kimbrel to Boston.

All four will be given the chance to win a starting job next spring. So in essence, their audition for a 2017 roster spot begins Wednesday.

"I think without a doubt they're all competing for a starting job next year," Green said. "I don't think any one of them has it in their back pocket, either. I think they're all out here; they all have something to prove. They've proved it every level they've played at, and that's why they're here. They've got to prove it here too."

EBS Player Adam Plutko called up to Cleveland Indians

Nearly two weeks after Adam Plutko last pitched for the Columbus Clippers -- the Cleveland Indians' Triple-A affiliate -- he received the call every baseball player dreams of. The problem: He was in the middle of his friend's wedding.

"They had literally just finished saying 'I do,'" Plutko told reporters.

Plutko, 24, assumed his season was over when the Clippers were eliminated from the playoffs. He returned home, enjoyed a few days off and traveled with his wife and parents to California for the wedding.

When the Indians' head of player development first called, he ignored it, assuming it was an exit interview. When he kept calling back, Plutko knew something was up. He answered and found out he was heading to the majors.

Now he joins the Indians recently-depleted pitching staff in the midst of a pennant race. Pretty decent excuse to leave a wedding early.

For EBS Players

Please review the game assignment dates and the roster for any conflicts. Any roster corrections will be made at report time.  

An updated roster will be sent to all of the college coaches and scouts in attendance.

Please report at the correct time and day, this is crucial for the event to run smoothly, so PLEASE be sure to arrive on the correct day(s) corresponding with the PDF linked below.

Remember to have your waiver printed and signed by a parent for the locations you will be attending. If you fail to sign and turn in the waiver, you will NOT be able to participate. UCI waiver and UCLA waiver are linked here.

What to Wear & Bring to Event:

EBS JERSEY will be Issued on Site
Grey Pants
Black Belt
Black Socks
Black Undershirt
All Baseball Gear
Metal BBCOR Bat
High School Hat
Lunch / Water / Snacks

UC Irvine Anteater Ballpark: Thursday August 4th & Friday August 5th, First Pitch 6:05 PM

Anteater Ballpark UCI
4000 Mesa Road
Irvine, CA 92617

*Parking is available in the Mesa Parking Structure, Anteater Ballpark is adjacent to the structure
* Please plan for the structure to be busy due to the L.A. Rams training at UCI.

UCLA Jackie Robinson Stadium: Friday August 12th, First Pitch 6:05 PM

Jackie Robinson Stadium
100 Constitution Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Player Rosters: Download

Player Report Times

BLUE TEAM (B)
2:15 PM Position / Two Way Players Report (With SIGNED WAIVERS)
4:30 PM Pitchers Report (With SIGNED WAIVERS)

RED TEAM (R)
3:05 PM Position / Two Way Players Report (With SIGNED WAIVERS)
4:45 PM Pitchers Report (With SIGNED WAIVERS)

Please contact me via text, call or email ONLY if you have any question or a matter that is urgent in nature.

We look forward to having another great Elite Baseball Series.  

See you at the yard.